Egyptian Rug Designs

Egyptian rugs have been woven for centuries and they are renowned for their high quality. It is rare for an authentic Egyptian rug to be available to buyers outside of the country, but the ones that are have a luxurious style and rich patterning.

Traditionally, hand knotted carpets made in Egypt were woven by hand and they represented the work of a skilled artisan. Most of them were woven by hand and they featured a lot of detail and rich textures. The price of these frantic floor coverings reflected the skill of their maker, due to the time required to produce one of these works of art.

Early Egyptian Rug Designs

Early Egyptian rugs were transported to other countries in the East by traders. The earliest styles used geometric designs. Early weavers took inspiration for their designs from other countries, which meant that Anatolian and Persian designs influenced web makers in Egypt. Egyptian rugs are usually manufactured from wool and tied in an asymmetrical fashion, known as Ghiordes knots.

Mamluk Period of Egyptian Rugs

The Mamluk period started in the 15th century and lasted until the early part of the 16th century. The rugs produced during this time were known as Mamluks. These rugs are extremely rare and are considered by experts to be some the finest examples of weaving ever produced.

This rug style features three colours: red, green and blue. Repeating geometric patterns inside squares or circles were used, and stylized leaf patterns were very popular. Mamluk rugs were often made with a centre rectangle accented by a border. The centre design would be geometric in appearance, while the border design would be made up of vines and clusters of leaves. These patterns would also be repeated in the background of the rug and are a form of Arabic calligraphy.

Mamluk rug makers would use the same number of knots horizontally and vertically when forming the rug. As a result, a weaver could create a design featuring perfectly shaped squares and circles. The fact that they were made with high-quality wools and dyes meant that Mamluks were striking in colour and had an attractive sheen.

Ottoman Period of Egyptian Rugs

The Ottoman style of Egyptian rugs came into fashion in the years 1540 through 1550. The colour palette and design were similar to the ones used for Mamluk rugs. Red tones such as burgundy and wine red rugs were common. This style gained popularity, more and more rugs began incorporating medallions, palmettes, and lancet leaves were made. Other design elements commonly used when weaving Ottoman rugs were carnations, pomegranates, hyacinths and tulips. Sine knots were used instead of Turkish ones, and this gave the rugs a very elegant appearance.

Both of these Egyptian rug styles produced finished products that were highly prized for their exquisite detail and rich jewel tones. The Ottoman rug design reflected the influence of the Turkish designs that were popular at the time. While few specimens of these Egyptian rugs remain, the ones that still exist are rightfully considered works of art.

Egyptian Rug Designs

Egyptian rugs have been woven for centuries and they are renowned for their high quality. It is rare for an authentic Egyptian rug to be available to buyers outside of the country, but the ones that are have a luxurious style and rich patterning.

Traditionally, hand knotted carpets made in Egypt were woven by hand and they represented the work of a skilled artisan. Most of them were woven by hand and they featured a lot of detail and rich textures. The price of these frantic floor coverings reflected the skill of their maker, due to the time required to produce one of these works of art.

Early Egyptian Rug Designs

Early Egyptian rugs were transported to other countries in the East by traders. The earliest styles used geometric designs. Early weavers took inspiration for their designs from other countries, which meant that Anatolian and Persian designs influenced web makers in Egypt. Egyptian rugs are usually manufactured from wool and tied in an asymmetrical fashion, known as Ghiordes knots.

Mamluk Period of Egyptian Rugs

The Mamluk period started in the 15th century and lasted until the early part of the 16th century. The rugs produced during this time were known as Mamluks. These rugs are extremely rare and are considered by experts to be some the finest examples of weaving ever produced.

This rug style features three colours: red, green and blue. Repeating geometric patterns inside squares or circles were used, and stylized leaf patterns were very popular. Mamluk rugs were often made with a centre rectangle accented by a border. The centre design would be geometric in appearance, while the border design would be made up of vines and clusters of leaves. These patterns would also be repeated in the background of the rug and are a form of Arabic calligraphy.

Mamluk rug makers would use the same number of knots horizontally and vertically when forming the rug. As a result, a weaver could create a design featuring perfectly shaped squares and circles. The fact that they were made with high-quality wools and dyes meant that Mamluks were striking in colour and had an attractive sheen.

Ottoman Period of Egyptian Rugs

The Ottoman style of Egyptian rugs came into fashion in the years 1540 through 1550. The colour palette and design were similar to the ones used for Mamluk rugs. Red tones such as burgundy and wine red rugs were common. This style gained popularity, more and more rugs began incorporating medallions, palmettes, and lancet leaves were made. Other design elements commonly used when weaving Ottoman rugs were carnations, pomegranates, hyacinths and tulips. Sine knots were used instead of Turkish ones, and this gave the rugs a very elegant appearance.

Both of these Egyptian rug styles produced finished products that were highly prized for their exquisite detail and rich jewel tones. The Ottoman rug design reflected the influence of the Turkish designs that were popular at the time. While few specimens of these Egyptian rugs remain, the ones that still exist are rightfully considered works of art.