Indian Rugs - A Beautiful Choice

Indian rugs are known for their intense colours. Weavers traditionally use green, light blue, pink and off-white rug tones in their work. The highly detailed designs used in the rug are generally asymmetrical in nature and are rooted in realistic themes.

A number of rugs made in this part of the world include floral designs and figures laid out in a directional manner. Most layouts used are made with rows or grids. The overall theme of these designs is one that is very refined and aristocratic in nature. Indian rugs have become synonamous as quality cheap rugs.

Indian Oriental rugs are made using asymmetrical knots and are prized. The foundation used for the rug is usually made of cotton. The type of tool used depends on the region where the rug was made. If the rug was made in the northern part of the country, soft and shiny Kashmir wool is often used. Silk may be used in the foundation and for the pile of an Indian rug. Indian rugs are usually made in a medium-to-large size.

Antique Indian rugs are found in museums or form part of major collections. These would be datable to the 16th and 17th centuries, and are further grouped into distinct decorative types. Unfortunately, the region where the rugs were made cannot be established with any certainty by examining the design.

Floral Indian rugs

The most common pattern used in Indian roads is a floral motif. Flowering plants are featured in the robust design, and are usually arranged in a series of horizontal rows. In some antique Indian rugs, small flowers are arranged on the rug in clumps and each one is joined to the other by extinction of the stem. Similar designs are used in Persian rugs.

Figures in Indian rugs

Some Indian rugs feature hunting scenes in their design. These types of rugs would be larger to accommodate their detailed designs, and the figures they depict are usually in motion. Indian elephants are typically depicted in these carpets, which often feature a border made up of masks. The waqwaq tree is another common element found in these types of Indian rugs.

Indian rugs in the 19th century

In the 19th century, Indian rug designs changed to meet market demands. Instead of traditional Indian designs, European themes or designs that mimicked classic Persian patterns were made. Local carpet making facilities were often taken over by European or British companies, and this had a definite effect on this style of product being produced.

In the 1860s and 70s, Indian rug manufacturers started using chemical dyes on their products. As a result, newer rugs had a more muted appearance than the traditional ones, which were known for their bold colouring. All Indian carpets are made in facilities in cities, since this country does not have a nomadic population that would have its own tribal designs. Instead, my idea of rendering is made by examining the quality of its wool. Soft, shiny wool generally means the rug was made in the northern region. Rough, opaque wool is generally used in southern regions of India.

Indian Rugs - A Beautiful Choice

Indian rugs are known for their intense colours. Weavers traditionally use green, light blue, pink and off-white rug tones in their work. The highly detailed designs used in the rug are generally asymmetrical in nature and are rooted in realistic themes.

A number of rugs made in this part of the world include floral designs and figures laid out in a directional manner. Most layouts used are made with rows or grids. The overall theme of these designs is one that is very refined and aristocratic in nature. Indian rugs have become synonamous as quality cheap rugs.

Indian Oriental rugs are made using asymmetrical knots and are prized. The foundation used for the rug is usually made of cotton. The type of tool used depends on the region where the rug was made. If the rug was made in the northern part of the country, soft and shiny Kashmir wool is often used. Silk may be used in the foundation and for the pile of an Indian rug. Indian rugs are usually made in a medium-to-large size.

Antique Indian rugs are found in museums or form part of major collections. These would be datable to the 16th and 17th centuries, and are further grouped into distinct decorative types. Unfortunately, the region where the rugs were made cannot be established with any certainty by examining the design.

Floral Indian rugs

The most common pattern used in Indian roads is a floral motif. Flowering plants are featured in the robust design, and are usually arranged in a series of horizontal rows. In some antique Indian rugs, small flowers are arranged on the rug in clumps and each one is joined to the other by extinction of the stem. Similar designs are used in Persian rugs.

Figures in Indian rugs

Some Indian rugs feature hunting scenes in their design. These types of rugs would be larger to accommodate their detailed designs, and the figures they depict are usually in motion. Indian elephants are typically depicted in these carpets, which often feature a border made up of masks. The waqwaq tree is another common element found in these types of Indian rugs.

Indian rugs in the 19th century

In the 19th century, Indian rug designs changed to meet market demands. Instead of traditional Indian designs, European themes or designs that mimicked classic Persian patterns were made. Local carpet making facilities were often taken over by European or British companies, and this had a definite effect on this style of product being produced.

In the 1860s and 70s, Indian rug manufacturers started using chemical dyes on their products. As a result, newer rugs had a more muted appearance than the traditional ones, which were known for their bold colouring. All Indian carpets are made in facilities in cities, since this country does not have a nomadic population that would have its own tribal designs. Instead, my idea of rendering is made by examining the quality of its wool. Soft, shiny wool generally means the rug was made in the northern region. Rough, opaque wool is generally used in southern regions of India.