Nomadic, Villiage and Workshop Rugs

There are three general categories of Oriental rugs that consumers would be interested in buying. Each category has its own distinctive style, and reflects the purpose for which the rug was made. Whether you choose a nomadic, village or workshop rug, you will own a thing of beauty and superb artisanship.

Nomadic rugs

As their name implies, nomadic rugs were made by wandering tribes. They were made for personal use, as opposed to being an item that the maker was planning to sell for profit. These types of rugs were used for practical purposes as well as ceremonial ones.

Rug makers would work from memory to create attractive designs and these patterns were handed down from generation to generation. As a result, they reflected the culture of the tribes that made them through their patterns and the techniques used to fashion them.

Nomadic rugs are known for their simple designs and primary colours. The overall design tends to be asymmetrical, which results in a unique floor covering. These types of rugs were made using thick wool and as a result, the weave is coarser than with other, later Oriental rugs. These types of rugs often have inaccuracies or mistakes in them but these are considered signs of character and distinguishing marks of the original weaver.

Village rugs

In contrast to nomadic grey rugs, village rugs were made by women working at home with the intention of selling them. These rugs, fashioned using bright colours and designs, reflected the creativity of the weaver. Tribal patterns influenced their designs, and the overall effect was a more sophisticated product than the one found in nomadic rugs.

Village rug makers would take a traditional design and put their own interpretation on it to give it an updated appearance. Some of these rugs were woven from memory, while others were prepared from a design drawing. Because of this, the finished product would have a series of repeating patterns and more of the freeform appearance than workshop rugs.

Workshop rugs

Workshop rugs were woven in a specific location, and the weavers were paid a wage to produce particular designs. The weavers working on this style of rug would have a visual pattern to refer to and they would follow it knot by knot.

Looms in these types of commercial operations were larger and more sophisticated. As a result, weavers could produce hallway rugs with more complex designs by using finer yarn. Workshop rugs often featured tiny yet very detailed patterning that would cover the entire field of the rug. Along with these intricate patterns, workshop drugs were known for their classic themes and intricate patterning.

All of these types of Oriental rugs have their own characteristics, and unique features. Each one can be described as a true work of art that would be a welcome addition to your home. Whether you are interested in a nomadic, village or workshop rug, you can be assured that the person who fashioned it was focused on making something that would be beautiful and functional at the same time.

Nomadic, Villiage and Workshop Rugs

There are three general categories of Oriental rugs that consumers would be interested in buying. Each category has its own distinctive style, and reflects the purpose for which the rug was made. Whether you choose a nomadic, village or workshop rug, you will own a thing of beauty and superb artisanship.

Nomadic rugs

As their name implies, nomadic rugs were made by wandering tribes. They were made for personal use, as opposed to being an item that the maker was planning to sell for profit. These types of rugs were used for practical purposes as well as ceremonial ones.

Rug makers would work from memory to create attractive designs and these patterns were handed down from generation to generation. As a result, they reflected the culture of the tribes that made them through their patterns and the techniques used to fashion them.

Nomadic rugs are known for their simple designs and primary colours. The overall design tends to be asymmetrical, which results in a unique floor covering. These types of rugs were made using thick wool and as a result, the weave is coarser than with other, later Oriental rugs. These types of rugs often have inaccuracies or mistakes in them but these are considered signs of character and distinguishing marks of the original weaver.

Village rugs

In contrast to nomadic grey rugs, village rugs were made by women working at home with the intention of selling them. These rugs, fashioned using bright colours and designs, reflected the creativity of the weaver. Tribal patterns influenced their designs, and the overall effect was a more sophisticated product than the one found in nomadic rugs.

Village rug makers would take a traditional design and put their own interpretation on it to give it an updated appearance. Some of these rugs were woven from memory, while others were prepared from a design drawing. Because of this, the finished product would have a series of repeating patterns and more of the freeform appearance than workshop rugs.

Workshop rugs

Workshop rugs were woven in a specific location, and the weavers were paid a wage to produce particular designs. The weavers working on this style of rug would have a visual pattern to refer to and they would follow it knot by knot.

Looms in these types of commercial operations were larger and more sophisticated. As a result, weavers could produce hallway rugs with more complex designs by using finer yarn. Workshop rugs often featured tiny yet very detailed patterning that would cover the entire field of the rug. Along with these intricate patterns, workshop drugs were known for their classic themes and intricate patterning.

All of these types of Oriental rugs have their own characteristics, and unique features. Each one can be described as a true work of art that would be a welcome addition to your home. Whether you are interested in a nomadic, village or workshop rug, you can be assured that the person who fashioned it was focused on making something that would be beautiful and functional at the same time.