The Afghan Rug

As their name implies, Afghan rugs are made in Afghanistan. Woven by hand, they are surprisingly inexpensive. Consumers who are looking for a unique look for an indoor space may want to consider this type of floor covering.

One of the unique features of Afghan rugs is that they are collared using natural products. Vegetable and other types of dyes were traditionally used to create the rich colours that characterize these rugs. Most Afghans are medium-sized or circular rugs and feature a red background.

Afghan tribal rugs

When nomads were looking for materials to make their rugs, they would use what was readily available. Sheep wool was the main material and was used warp and weft, as well as the rug's pile. The nomads would thrive vitiate into a stream to clean the wool before shearing whenever possible. After the sheep were sheared, the rule would need to be sorted according to its colour and quality.

The next step in the process would be to comb, and spin the yarn. After this has been completed, the wool is dyed. One person can dye up to one kilogram of yarn each day.

Natural dyes may still be used at times but synthetic ones have become increasingly popular since the 1950s. The synthetic variety may be used on its own or in conjunction with natural dyes to create specific colours in Afghan designs from red to fuchsia pink rugs.

If natural dyes are being used to make the rugs, the yarn is soaked in a fixing bath made up of alum, urine, tin, ferrous sulphate or copper sulphate. The yarn is removed from the fixing bath and placed into a dye bath. The longer the yarn stays in the dye, the darker the colour will be.

The yarn is removed from the dye bath, washed and hung up to dry. Traditionally, men looked after drying the yarn for Afghan rugs.

One of the problems of using natural dyes used to make Afghan rugs is that they fade out over time. This uneven colouring, which can appear as marbling or speckling on the rug, is known as abrash. It commonly occurs in spots on rugs where the weaver ran out of a bolt of yarn and had to either dye another lot or buy some yarn in a similar tone to complete the rug.

Abrash is a desirable trait among rug buyers. It is a sign that natural dyes were used for weaving. In synthetic rugs, the fibres will fade out only in places where the rug is exposed to the sun. If a buyer wants to give a newer Afghan rug the look of one made with natural dyes, he or she can simply place it out in the sun.

An Afghan rug's rich colours and detailed patterns bring an exotic feel to any home. With their deep red, blue, green, yellow, purple and brown tones, these floor coverings can coordinate with a number of colour schemes. They look best in rooms where they can be a focal point, and the furniture and other items should be relatively plain.

The Afghan Rug

As their name implies, Afghan rugs are made in Afghanistan. Woven by hand, they are surprisingly inexpensive. Consumers who are looking for a unique look for an indoor space may want to consider this type of floor covering.

One of the unique features of Afghan rugs is that they are collared using natural products. Vegetable and other types of dyes were traditionally used to create the rich colours that characterize these rugs. Most Afghans are medium-sized or circular rugs and feature a red background.

Afghan tribal rugs

When nomads were looking for materials to make their rugs, they would use what was readily available. Sheep wool was the main material and was used warp and weft, as well as the rug's pile. The nomads would thrive vitiate into a stream to clean the wool before shearing whenever possible. After the sheep were sheared, the rule would need to be sorted according to its colour and quality.

The next step in the process would be to comb, and spin the yarn. After this has been completed, the wool is dyed. One person can dye up to one kilogram of yarn each day.

Natural dyes may still be used at times but synthetic ones have become increasingly popular since the 1950s. The synthetic variety may be used on its own or in conjunction with natural dyes to create specific colours in Afghan designs from red to fuchsia pink rugs.

If natural dyes are being used to make the rugs, the yarn is soaked in a fixing bath made up of alum, urine, tin, ferrous sulphate or copper sulphate. The yarn is removed from the fixing bath and placed into a dye bath. The longer the yarn stays in the dye, the darker the colour will be.

The yarn is removed from the dye bath, washed and hung up to dry. Traditionally, men looked after drying the yarn for Afghan rugs.

One of the problems of using natural dyes used to make Afghan rugs is that they fade out over time. This uneven colouring, which can appear as marbling or speckling on the rug, is known as abrash. It commonly occurs in spots on rugs where the weaver ran out of a bolt of yarn and had to either dye another lot or buy some yarn in a similar tone to complete the rug.

Abrash is a desirable trait among rug buyers. It is a sign that natural dyes were used for weaving. In synthetic rugs, the fibres will fade out only in places where the rug is exposed to the sun. If a buyer wants to give a newer Afghan rug the look of one made with natural dyes, he or she can simply place it out in the sun.

An Afghan rug's rich colours and detailed patterns bring an exotic feel to any home. With their deep red, blue, green, yellow, purple and brown tones, these floor coverings can coordinate with a number of colour schemes. They look best in rooms where they can be a focal point, and the furniture and other items should be relatively plain.